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roof lining

hi
can any one tell me how to put a new roof lining in my hq ute
thanks

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roof lining

yeah pay someone that knows what they are doing to do it.. thats what i am going to do ..
Cheers Quent..

Pig's Tips - "Fitting a Hood Lining"

Pigs Hood Lining Fitting Tips

Let’s start with what tools you will need for this job:
1) Phillips head screwdriver.
2) A couple of Flat Blade screwdrivers.
3) A Stanley Knife with new blades.
4) A tin of Bear Contact Glue.
5) A couple of Brushes to paint the Contact glue on with, 1cm wide should suffice.
6) A tin of Wax and Grease Remover.
7) An assortment of Spring Steel Paper Clips with the Fold back handles.
8) Or a piece of Pinch Welt cut into suitable lengths to hold the Hood lining in place.
9) A roll of 2 inch wide Masking Tape.
10) A Hair Dryer.
11) A couple of Pins.
12) An assortment of clean cloth like T-Shirt material for cleaning up.
13) A Carton of XXXX or Bundy for when you finally finish *PMSL*

Ok here we go;
Ok to fit your new lining, I take it you have had one stitched up?
If it is an old original that you have had rolled up for years waiting to fit up forget it as a week or two is long enough for the vinyl type hood linings to shrink and give you hell come time to refit it!
Ok, working on the assumption that it is a brand new re-stitched hood lining with a bit of extra material to assist in the fitting, we will go from there ok...
Ok trying to remember back to when the old girls were popular sights in the old Panel shop days... I am sure if I muff up someone else will fill in that which I have missed?
Firstly, you will of course, need to have your rear screen removed from the Ute.
Remove the sun visors, pinch welt from around the door frames, windscreen pillar trims, seat belt bolts and anything else attached to the vinyl roof inside your Ute.
Remove the old lining (unless you have already done this to have the new stitched from as a pattern?
Now on your Hood lining will be material loops where the Hood Bows slip through to hold the lining up off of your head.
Locate the centre one, slip the Hood Bow thru the looped piece of material stitched into your new lining and sitting in the driver’s seat, locate the corresponding centre hole in the inner roof frame and slide the Hood Bow into its mounting hole on the passenger side of the inner roof frame.
Then, you may wish to slightly slide the material towards the passenger side for this next part, holding the drivers side end of the Hood Bow put ya shoulder into it and try and push the bow towards the passenger side to locate the Hood Bow into the hole in the drivers side of the inner roof frame.
You will get it close and may need to use a flat blade screw driver to lever the Hood Bow that last bit to guide it into the hole.
They’re flaming strong, so bear with it, you will get it into the 2nd hole eventually hehe.
Now move one step towards the front, slide the next Hood Bow in thru the material loop and repeat the operation.
Once you have the front one in, move back one from the centre hood bow and repeat the process until you have all the hood bows in position.
Now take your Spring Steel paper clips and starting in the middle on say, the passenger side, gently pull the vinyl around the door frame, not too tightly at this time and place a paper clip over where the pinch welt fits to later around the door frame.
Move to the drivers side, do the same, then check that inside the roof lining looks to be centred.
Once you are sure it is centred, move to the next hood bow in the front, grab the vinyl, gently pull it around the door frame and place the clip in place to hold the vinyl and whip around to the passenger side to do the same, repeat this process until you have a clip inline with each of the hood bows and one or two in between each stitched panel of the vinyl to hold it all secure.
Sit back inside the Ute and look up making sure the Hood lining is centred and looks to be spot on, make any necessary adjustments now to make sure it is centred.
Now move to the rear of the Hood lining around the back window and door frames, start tucking it into place, folding it over and around the rear window frame then around the door frame.
Moving side to side making sure you are evenly folding it around the frame and clipping into place, continue doing this until you have it held securely in place and wrinkles are at a minimum.
Now move back to the front of the screen.
This is where I get a little fuzzy?
I think there is a lip of sorts internally that the Hood lining folds around, then is held in place by a piece of pinch welt running across the top of the front windscreen so you won't need to remove the front heat sealed screen.
Once you have all the Hood Bows in place, the Hood lining clipped in and everything set for go, get out the Bear Contact glue and the brush.
Starting say, on the Drivers side, remove a few of the clips in the centre of the top of the Door frame and carefully apply the contact glue to the inside of the vinyl around where it will wrap around the inner and outer parts of the frame, then do the same to the frame inside and out where the pinch welt will fit around.
Wait a few minutes, when the glue is dry to the touch, carefully pull on the hood lining and holding firm tension on it, gently press it up against the door frame, carefully folding it around the frame pressing it onto the metal to glue it down, once satisfied, slip the paper clip back over to hold the lining in place, continue doing this until you have done from the top rear corner to the top front of the screen.
Once the top section of the door frame is done, move to the other side door frame to repeat the process.
Looking inside as you pull the other side tight, you should notice if you are pulling the vinyl straight and keeping it taut, so there is no sag or wrinkles left behind.
Once you have the passenger side done and glued into place from the top rear to the top front of the door frame, start on the rear window section.
Sitting on the front seats facing the rear of the cabin, start at the top centre of the hood lining and remove a couple of clips, glue the frame, then brush the glue over the inside of the hood lining along either side of the fold, leave it tack off, then holding the hood lining firmly, pull it down, then wrap it around the centre of the rear window frame, press down, make sure the contact glue is holding it in place, then replace the clips.
Move to the driver’s side and remove a few clips, doing this in say, 30cm sections at a time, if in doubt, do it in 15cm sections.
Once you do that short section, move to the passenger side and do that short section, move back to the drivers side, back to the passenger side etc until eventually you have the hood lining firmly glued into place around the rear window frame.
Now hop out and give your legs a deserved stretch.
Starting say, on the drivers side, work from the top rear corner down, gluing a section at a time, pulling the vinyl firmly, pressing it down where you have it taut without any wrinkles and keep going until the drivers corner is glued into place.
Once you are finished, go around to the passenger's side of the Ute to repeat the process.
Keep an eye on the inside making sure you keep a nice firm hold on the vinyl to keep it taut manipulating it to keep its bouncy shape without the wrinkles.
If you start to get a few wrinkles, get your girlfriend to hop inside with her hair dryer, turn the heat up and blow over the wrinkles while you gently pull the vinyl into place, some will shrink while you can move the vinyl around until you pull the rest out.
Once the passenger door frame is done, jump back inside, glue the insides of the hood lining and frame where it will fold around at the top of the windscreen.
Again, when it is tack dry, beginning from the centre, pull the hood lining forward and fold it around the front frame section, moving section by section, left to right back to the left back to the right until you have it all glued into place.
By now, if you have done everything right, you should be able to look up at a brand new smooth as a baby’s bum wrinkle free vinyl hood lining!
Now all you need to do is fit and glue the lower rear sections into place (again I cannot remember if the lower section of vinyl is folded over and glued or if there is a strip/ panel holding this lower section into place?)
Once that is done, it is just a matter of getting the Stanley knife with a brand new blade and gently running around the excess material around the outer door and rear window frames.
Try to cut it so it is folded around the frame for extra strength, but there isn't too much excess so it can be seen hanging out past the pinch welt around the door frames and rear window rubber, discretion is the better part of valor here guys and gals, leave too much and it will look silly, cut it off level with the edge of the frame and if it shrinks it will pull out from around the frame and fall out from the inside as it shrinks, so try to leave around 8mm to 10mm wrapped around the outer frame so it will be hidden beneath the pinch welt and window rubber.
Refit the Pinch Welt and scuff plates.
Refit the Windscreen Pillar covers.
Feeling along the frame, work out where the Sun Visors screw into place (a pin comes in handy here) using the Stanley Knife, gently cut a couple of small slits where the visor spring pushes thru the hole and screw them into place, same for the Rear View Mirror as it to screws to the inner roof frame from memory?
Ok, now again, the same with the interior light, feel around where it fits, using a pin find the screw holes then carefully again with the Stanley knife, cut a few small slits in the middle of the frame hole and screw the interior light into place remembering to re-join the wiring so you actually have an interior light lol.
Now its time to run a small 1/4inch nylon rope around the inside groove of the rear screen rubber that you have thoroughly cleaned and placed the glass into, now is also a great time to apply a film of Automotive Tint seeing as the rear screen is relatively flat and really easy to tint yourself.
Firstly, fit the rubber around the screen, then lay it down onto a table or clean flat surface.
When you wrap the rope around, start around quarter way along the bottom, work the rope into the groove all the way around again overlapping along the bottom to around a quarter of the way to the other side, tape the two ends of the rope to the inside of the glass.
Now, with the help of a couple of friends, get one each side to hold the screen in place, try to get the bottom groove over the frames lip, then get them to firmly hold the screen down from the top while gently pushing it towards the body at the top.
Now grab the two ropes, if all is seated well, you should be able to pull the right rope towards the left and the left rope towards the right with them crossing over in the middle, pulling the rubber lip up and over the frames lip so the screen is sitting firmly over the bottom lip, then working one bottom corner first, gently ‘waggle’ the rope to manipulate the rubber lip up and over the frame.
You will see the screen ‘settle’ into place a little once the bottom corner is pulled into place, get the mates to use the soft under parts of their clenched fist (beside their little finger) and ‘bump’ the rear screen down softly to settle it into place, do this until you have both bottom corners of the rubber pulled over the lip of the frame.
Then working one side first, pull the rope up gently, again ‘waggle’ the rope in circular motions to get the top corner of the rubber pulled over the frames lip, again getting the mates to ‘bump’ the screen and settle it into place, then repeat this on the other top corner doing the same until it settles into place.
Do not rush this or try and run around in the one direction only, as the screen will only flex so far before shattering, this needs to be done one side, one section at a time, evenly.
This is the home run, you will have noticed by now the screen has sat firmly into place and all you have to do is pull the top part of the rubber over the lip of the frame, but don’t get too cocky just yet, keeping a firm grip on one end of the rope, again ‘waggle’ the rope in circular motions and manipulate the rubber over the lip of the frame.
If you rush this part, it is possible the rope will pull out and the rubber beading will stick in behind the frames lip, this will then entail you, with a blunt flat head screw driver to carefully manipulate the beading out from behind the frame until you have enough out to start again with the rope pulling the rubber out over lip of the frame, the possibility here is one slip could see the screw driver slashing thru the vinyl hood lining and all your hard work and money will be down the drain.
Now it’s a matter of out with the caulking gun, I prefer to use Sikaflex, never ever use silicone type sealers as these promote rust, fast!
Now tape up around the rear window with a couple of strips of 2inch wide masking tape so it will make the cleanup that bit easier, run a bead of windscreen sealer around the inner lip between the rubber and the glass first, then pushing the tip of the Caulking gun under the screen rubber and the body, run a bead of sealer around the rubber to seal the screen so no water can enter between the rubber and the body.
Now it’s a matter of grabbing a tin of wax and grease remover, some clean rags, wipe away the excess sealer first with a dry rag, then wet a clean rag with the wax and grease remover and carefully start cleaning around the rear screen.
Once you are pretty close, tear the tape away and do the final cleanup.
Remember, after you have washed the old girl down; give it another coat of wax and polish, especially around the rear screen where you have hit it over with the wax and grease remover, as this does exactly what it says.
After a day or so of driving, the rear screen will have settled into place.
Get inside and get someone with a hose on the outside to squirt around the rear screen to see if there are any leaks around the rubber and the body work/ screen areas.
If there is, it is back out to throw another bead around the glass and the rubber and the rubber and the body until the leak stops.
Also remember that the hose doesn’t need to be of a steam cleaning strength with the blast of water, you only wish to simulate the effects of driving around in a storm, not a typhoon.
With the exception of whether the rear screen uses a beading strip in the actual screen rubber, this too I cannot remember, but I do think I have covered everything?
OH [Naughty Pottyword]!
Sorry, I forgot, after doing this you will feel as I do most days being a cripple lol
This is where the carton of XXXX or Bundy comes into play PMSL
Ok guys and gals correct me if I am wrong, if I have covered everything, another one for the boys to whip off to the Holden-Pedia!
If not let me know ok?
And no the XXXX and Bundy isn’t up for debate unless your suggestion revolves around Iced Coffee PMSL

Cheers, Pig (oinks308 a.k.a. The Marathon Post Replier)

marathon posts

Keep them up please oinks I sure am learning a hell of a lot from them.

oinks is a legend

great that he's so dedicated to the site, we all need every bit of info we can get for restoring our old girls!
keep up the good work oinks :)
70ute [and a 68 kingy]

After reading all that

I'm sure glad the hoodlining in my ute is in pretty good condition lol

Great one Oinks!

Now that my legs have had a stretch, and my eyes have stoped straining, id just like to know, if in the ol VH's if you have to remove the front and rear screens, and if you do, are they easier enough to remove (i know how to fit them, but ive never removed them lol) and if it is difficult, would a winscreen shop be able to do it?
Ill just say now, mine in great nick, but im in the process of getting a cloth one made up, as the rest of the interior is cloth, so i just want to keep the theme lol!

On a Quiet day in HOLDEN land, you can hear the F@RDS Rusting!

lpg253 re: removing your Hoodlining...

Hey mate, sorry I missed this one when ya posted it, got a bit bored tonight an went scrolling back lol
Yes, you do have to remove both the front and rear screens.
The rest is pretty much the same as what I wrote for the ute.
Beauty here is if your using material then it wont shrink like the vinyl does, but on the other hand wrinkles wont 'iron' out using a heat gun either so you will have to pay closer attention when fitting it in to keep it centred.
If you are using Velour, try not to get the glue on the back of the material that isn't going to be glued down.
If you do and notice then try to pull the glue apart to re-glue it down straight it will pull the velour pile thru the material, not a pretty sight when your looking at a plush surface that has bald spots hehe
You should be able to loosen around the rubbers with a screw driver to free things up a bit, then gettin a mate or three, one or both climb in on the back seat and evenly space your bare feet along the top quarter of the screen and carefully working as a team push the rear screen out...evenly.
Make sure there is someone on the outside to steady the screen as it comes out and once 1/2 or 3/4's the way you can climb out then carefully lift the screen up and lift it's rubber from the frame.
If you have a Laminated Windscreen, it will most likely crack on its removal.
Screen fitters and most wreckers won't guarentee the removal of a used screen because the older they get the more brittle the Laminated section will become increasing the chances of it being cracked.
Safety glass will be easier to remove, but I don't like safety glass when used in windscreens as you are prone to getting the millions of minute particle/ slivers of glass into your eyes when they shatter and a Doctor cannot see clear glass splinters in your eyes if this is the case.
As dangerous as the larger slivers of glass from a laminated screen can be, the laminated screens still offer a far higher degree of safety and protection to the cars occupants than a likewise safety glass screen.
You only have to watch the news regards these maggots who throw items from overhead bridges, laminated screens won't stop everything, but it will stop the object penetrating the screen before safety glass will in most cases.
Altho it only appears on the local news every now and then, sitting at home listening to a Police Scanner sure as hell opens your eyes up to how often this does occur without reporting, especially so during the school holidays but sadly, despite these crimes being committed mostly by young children who are 'bored', quiet a few adults with mental conditions are also just as guilty and under the mental act the Police can only pick these guys up and return them home or to their carers, so its not only kids to blame here.
Getting back to it hehe, if your rubbers are shot and you plan on replacing them with better or new rubbers, then using a stanley knife, cut around the glass, then beneath the rubber along the screen, this will then allow you too easily (and carefully), lift the glass from the old rubber minimising the chances of cracking or shattering the glass.
With windscreens, I have found it much easier these days to get a Mobile Windscreen service out to remove the old then replace it with a new fully tinted screen with a tinted band across the top laminated screen.
This way they remove, clean, replace and take away the old shattered screen, very handy indeed.
Two services I use locally around the Ipswich/ Brisbane area depending on which one isn't as busy as the other and which one gives the better quote on the day (hehe It always pays to 'shop around') is Willowbank Car Glass 0754 673 411 or Economy Windscreen 073 275 3838.
These guys come out to your home and are friendly, curteous, quick, efficiant and bloody well priced too compared to actually driving into some of the larger better known business's.
The Laminated screens I normally get have a light grey tint thru the glass top to bottom as well as having the tinted band across the top, just like Sunnies for your ride hehe and they use a poly compond to seal your screens with, top notch stuff and I cannot speak highly enough for their professionalism.
Sorry about the delay in answering mate, with winter approaching, my disabilities and I suspect a touch of old age catching up with me lol, I am finding it a lil hard to juggle my waking hours with the pain killers an shyte that see me almost living like a vampire shunning the daylight hours lol
If there is something else I maybe able to help you with ask away mate, I will see what I can do.

Cheers, Pig (oinks308)


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